Is it “I Digged it” or “I Dugg it”?

I really enjoyed the article, “How the Internet is changing language.” It’s fascinating to me to read all these new terms like rickrolling and lurker (which I have come across in my BCIT social media course and found out that I am one). Of course the verb to google is now well entrenched and I find that even I use it fairly often.

I liked the article so much, in fact, that I Digged it on Digg.com. Or did I Dugg it? It would seem that this social media site is so popular that it has created its own past tense form of this verb, as I have seen “Digged” more often that “Dugg.”

The article’s coverage of  “Txt Spk” — the new language which is a mixture of often vowel-free abbreviations and acronyms — was especially interesting to me as I have a 15-year-old who sends text messages in this strange dialect that I have to decipher. The funny thing is, I have an ancient cell phone with no keyboard, so it takes me ages to write a text. You remember: press the number three button three times for a “g,” the five button twice for a “k.” And I have to go into an entirely different screen for any punctuation. But I still find myself writing in full sentences, with proper grammar and spelling. I can’t help myself! Yet Nick, who has a fancy-dancy phone with a pull-out keyboard, writes in this garbled txt spk code.

Just yesterday, a friend who is my generation and in the same line of business (communications), lamented that her kids don’t know proper English. Phew, I thought it was just mine! And I always blamed it on the French Immersion schooling that I chose for them while they were still in-utero.

Which made me wonder, when kids text in this strange language, do they know it’s wrong, that it’s just a shorthand? Or is that how they will write for the rest of their lives? Well, my friend and I ended our conversation with a laugh because their deficiency adds to our bankable skills. While our business skills may seem elusive even to us sometimes (she used the word poser), at least we know how to use an apostrophe!

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